Allison Polgar

The experience of living in a blatantly consumer driven, suburban environment previously compelled the search for visual material outside of my immediate locale, but the unnoticed, ignored, and reviled structures that surround us have become motivating factors for this body of work. Instead of attempting to glaze over these structures and pretend they don’t exist (or that I exist separate from them), the impulse now is to meet them head on, to spend as much time lingering over their harsh and awkward angles as I would a more aesthetically pleasing structure. Environmental factors are denied as the only consideration is the current “need” dictated by commercialism, expansion, and progress.

This focus has also led to the question of whether it is perhaps admirably authentic that gas stations, fast food joints, strip clubs, and malls do not disguise themselves beneath a façade of thoughtful architecture, but stand openly as symbols of quick and ready consumption.